Dee Why Skin – dealing with

We’ve found that with most Sydney Dermatologists, their entry on the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency’s website shows something like this.

i.e. a “Fellowship of the Australasian college of Dermatologists” over and above the basic “Bachelor of Medicine / Bachelor of Surgery” qualification?

But this is not the case with any of the six doctors shown as practicing at Dee Why Skin.

Is this significant? Does it matter? We would love to know.

On 27 Apr. 2019, 8 days ago, this was sent in an email to the doctors there.

We would have thought that anyone considering consulting any of the doctors there was entitled to an answer to this question.

Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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Dr Clare Koh, Sydney Dermatologist

A Dr Clare Koh is shown as one of the dermatologists at Green Square Dermatology.

But we have been unable to find an entry for her on thc Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency’s website confirming that she is registered to practice medicine.

See this result.

We have just, on 2 May, 2019, sent her an email saying.

It will be interesting to see how this turns out. You would think there are only 3 possibilities – either (1) we have been at fault in some way as we’ve sought to find an entry for her on AHPRA’S website, or (2) the person calling herself Dr Koh isn’t registered to practice medicine, or (3) AHPRA is at fault in some way.

One thing is certain – and that is that if AHPRA turns out to be at fault, they won’t take too kindly to this being brought to their attention.

We’ll keep you advised.

A 22 May 2019 update: Not even an acknowledgement of the above email yet – 20 days later. We’ve just sent a reminder email. It would seem that there’s no one at Green Square Dermatology who’s job it is to respond to such emails.

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A General Comment

To summarise a fair bit of what we’ve been saying in this blog so far.

If a doctor is not prepared to put anything in writing, they should probably be avoided, other things being equal.

At the very least, after you’ve had a consultation with a doctor, you should be able to send them, (by “snail mail” if need be,) something along the lines of, “In our consultation today, I understood you to say, blah blah blah. Have I got this right?” and get an appropriate response. To us, if you don’t get a response to something like this, you’ve almost certainly wasted your time and money in seeing them, as it indicates to us that even they aren’t sure that what they’ve told you or recommended is helpful – that they certainly don’t want to be held ACCOUNTABLE for it.

And further, it is to be noted, that if they haven’t got an ordinary email address, they’ve only got an email form, it’s not very likely that you’ll get a response, and if they haven’t even got one of these, they’ve only got a fax number, it’s even less likely that you’ll get a response, and if they haven’t even got a fax number, just a phone number, and you have to resort to sending them a letter by Australia Post, it’s virtually certain that you won’t get a response.

(Of course these things apply just as much to other people and organisations that we may be thinking of dealing with.)

In saying this, it seems impossible to find GPs who will put anything in writing – at least in Sydney, Australia. It’s left to us, the people, to scratch around hoping that we’ll find one who won’t lead us too badly astray.

But, in relation to medical specialists, at least, modern communication technology provides means which we believe make it relatively easy to locate the 10 out of 10 doctors and to avoid those who deserve 1 or 2 out of 10 at best – means which we find INCREDIBLY EXCITING.

Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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Dr Bryan Pang dermatologist 2

So much on the web like this.

(Use this link to be taken to details of the five practices in his “empire.”)

Dr Pang skiting about his success as a dermatologist, while, at the same time, there are so many ratings on him on the web that are amongst the worst we’ve ever seen.

SO many people obviously thinking, “A doctor is a doctor – they’re all the same.” Readers, we all have to realise more that they’re NOT all the same! While many doctors deserve 10 out of 10, there are lots that deserve 2 or 1 or 0 out of 10, at the most! Our health and welfare is at stake.

To us how doctors respond, (and other people and organisations,) when emails are sent to them, provide more helpful indications as to what they’re really like, than the spiels they pay marketing people to come up with that make them out as some sort of gods. This simple email was sent to Dr Pang earlier today, (26 Apr. 2019,) using the email form on his website.

Perhaps we’ll have a better idea of what he’s really like when we get his response to this – that’s if we ever get one.

A 3 May 2019 update: A response has been received to the letter sent to Dr Pang on 26 Apr. 2019, using the email form on the Sydney Dermatology website, using the ordinary email address – info@sydneydermatology.net.au.

But any of our readers thinking of using him would need to be aware of the ratings on him on the web that are amongst the worst we’ve ever seen, particularly those on the RateMDs.com website, about which the most concerning thing would seem to be that they seem to be getting worse and worse, not better.

Mail us at info@questionsmisc.info.

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Doctors being ACCOUNTABLE 1

On 20 Mar. 2019, one of our readers claims to have sent the following in an email to Graeme Loy, Westmead Government Hospital’s CEO.

And that, on 26 Apr. 2019, 5 weeks and 2 days later, it hasn’t even been acknowledged.

Our reader further reports, that as well as Dr Thiagalingam giving him advice he’s sure was/is nonsense:-

(1) That he was running 2 hours late – he had to sit there for 2 hours waiting to see him.

(2) He drove in his car to the hospital to see the doctor and incurred a fine of $256 for parking in slightly the wrong way.

(3) The doctor has refused repeated requests to put his advices in writing.

(4) In any case, his advices could have been emailed to him in the first place – the face-to-face consultation took only 4 or 5 minutes.

But our main point is this – what a difference it would make if it was thought that Mr Loy might take 3 or 4 minutes to send an email to Dr Thiagalingam asking him if any of our readers claims had any substance, as an indication that he might care? But obviously Mr Loy doesn’t care. And if Brad Hazzard, the NSW Minister for Health did the same but he doesn’t care. And if the Shadow Minister for Health, Walt Secord, did the same, but he doesn’t care. And Ms Berejiklian doesn’t care.

Of course there’s always the possibility that Mr Loy has a brief to do a rotten stinking job so that the Government can save money as a consequence of the people of New South Wales learning to avoid Government hospitals and go to private hospitals instead.

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Doctors having their own website 1

These days, it’s incredibly easy for doctors, (or anyone,) to have their own website.

A name can be reserved in a few minutes, the software to create them is free, school children can create acceptable websites these days, and having them hosted costs no more 2 or 3 dollars a week.

To us their importance is that they can make it so much easier for prospective patients to learn the exact details of a doctors’ areas of expertise – this when medical knowledge is increasing and increasing making the percentage of it that any one doctor can cover well smaller and smaller. Not only can they make it easier and easier for prospective patients – all they have to do is Google the doctor’s name and all the important information they need on him or her is set out in front of them, but, to us, just as importantly, if not more importantly, they can make the doctor’s life easier and better in that the patients that come to them for help are the ones they can help the most. Only not so good doctors, those who are struggling to get enough patients, are interested in getting patients they can’t really help.

But, in practice, very few doctors have their own website. And when you send emails using the one and only email address for a whole practice, often no response at all is provided, or they are dealt with at the receptionist level by people who have no real idea of the areas of expertise of any particular doctor, who are often virtually abusive that you might have put them to any trouble, and we’ve even had emails saying, “Oh we don’t provide medical advice by email,” as though advising on doctors’ areas of expertise is providing medical advice!!!!!!

The Skin Hospital is a classical example. At last count there were 54 dermatologists listed on its website. Yet, in the past, we’ve found that when emails were sent to any one of them, it soon became obvious that they never passed on to the addressees, we were just told things like, “Oh, any one of our doctors could help you with that,” – this, when you could hardly get a specialisation with more sub-specialisations in it than dermatology. And the last couple of emails sent to it haven’t even been acknowledged!

In the words of Donald Duck, “Such dumbness might be catching!”

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Finding the best medical specialists to deal with

To find the best medical specialists to deal with, what we strongly recommend, (and do ourselves,) is that readers send an email to at least 20 of those who may be able to help them along these lines:-

And if they do this, we will be very surprised if they don’t feel it’s fairly easy to decide, from such replies as they get, which may be the best one or two specialists for them to at least have an initial face-to-face consultation with.

We strongly believe that if we had always been doing this ourselves over the last ten years it would have saved us from having three major operations that didn’t help in any way, and countless consultations with specialists that wasted our time and money.

To us, if a doctor, or someone on their behalf, provides a good response to such an email, it indicates:-

That they are into communication – many doctors aren’t into communication if you’re sitting right in front of them.

That they are likely to be prepared to put things in writing – which makes them ACCOUNTABLE for what they do and say. If a doctor is not prepared to put things in writing it probably indicates that they themselves don’t know whether the advice they’re giving is very good or not..

What we do and recommend is that after we’ve had a consultation with a doctor we write to them along these lines, (obviously if they have an ordinary email address, this makes it the easiest to do,) “In our consultation today, I understood you to say blah blah blah, blah blah. Have I got this right?”

If they’re not prepared, at the very least, to answer something like that, you’ve almost certainly wasted your time and money in seeing them.

Of course, the time consuming part in what we recommend, is putting together the email addresses that are needed to do it – we find that if these are readily available, it’s not hard to send out 40 emails in less than an hour.

To help with this we have started putting together the names of various medical specialists which readers can access readily – use this link to go to a list of over 35 Sydney Neurologiststhis link to go to a list of over 20 Sydney Dermatologists, and this link to go to a list of over 25 Sydney Gastroenerologists.

Email us on info@questionsmisc.info.

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Surrounding ourselves with the best information 1

For some time we’ve been expressing our belief that the secret to success in our work and personal lives is to surround ourselves with the best information and the best experts. And, although there’s a long way to go, the extent to which the developments in technology over, say, the last 25 years, have made this possible and is doing this, is, to us, nothing short of astonishing, particularly in relation to enabling us to surround ourselves with the best information in relation to health and wellbeing issues.

Being able to do Google searches to get the best information in the way that we can is a huge breakthrough. And we’ve recently become more aware of organisations, many of them huge, that claim to do a better job than just carrying out Google searches does.

The approach of these organisations, set out in this mission statement from the website of one of them is typical of their approach.

22screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-3-45-32-pm-copy

We have started putting together a list of these organisations – use this link to see how far we’ve got with this. We’ve been particularly impressed with the organisation called Search GMX, which you can try by going to it’s website, search.gmx.net, and getting it to carry out a search on whatever you like, and the result may well work better for you and us than doing a normal Google search.

But to us, these organisations are amazingly lacking in user friendliness and don’t work nearly as well as they could. One of them says that if we use their email form to send them a question, they MAY do some work on it, if it’s chosen, and MAY produce an article on it, which MAY be available in due course!!!

We have a dream – that ordinary email addresses will come to exist that we can use to submit questions in relation to health and wellbeing issues to individuals and organisations, and (1) our emails will be acknowledged more or less immediately, (2) in due course, we will receive emails back letting us know whether they can provide help or not, (3) If they can’t, they’ll provide details of any other individuals or organisations who may be able to provide help if they can’t, and (4) otherwise they’ll provide us with the best information they know of.

Perhaps such ordinary email addresses already exist? If any are known to any of our readers, we’d be SO grateful if they’d provide us with details on them, for our own use, and to be passed on to other readers.

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Phlegm in the throat treatment 1

One of our readers reports that he has recently had difficulty going to sleep at night because he has so much phlegm in his throat and he just can’t get rid of. He says that there seems to be two facets to this problem – firstly, that his body is producing so much phlegm, he’s never experienced so much before, and secondly, that once there’s phlegm in his throat, there seems to be no way he can get rid of it.

He spoke to his pharmacist and she recommended some cough liquid, but this hasn’t helped! And he sought the advice of his GP and she recommended an antibiotic, Amoxyclav AN 875/125, and this hasn’t helped!

Our guess is that he could speak to dozens of pharmacists and dozens of doctors, and while they wouldn’t hesitate to recommend things, none of them would work – as they say, “Often wrong but never in doubt.” But we intend to follow this up.

More later.

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Catherine King MP 3

Further to this post.

Our email sent to Ms King, the Shadow Minster for Health in the Federal Parliament, on 16 Aug 2016, still not even acknowledged yet, let alone replied to, despite reminders being sent to her.

It appears that neither she nor her party has any interest in or concerns about claims being made that 360 patients are being killed in Australia by medical error EVERY WEEK!

Jessie.

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